Randy Stewart

Fine Arts Producer

Randy Stewart joined the full-time KSMU staff in June 1978 after working part-time as a student announcer/producer for two years. His job has evolved from Music Director in the early days to encompassing production of a wide range of arts-related programming and features for KSMU, including the online and Friday morning "Arts News." Stewart assists volunteer producers John Darkhorse (Route 66 Blues Express), Lee Worman (The Gold Ring), and Emily Higgins (The Mulberry Tree) with the production of their programs. He's also become the de facto "Voice of KSMU" in recent years due to the many hours per day he’s heard doing local station breaks. Stewart’s record of service on behalf of the Springfield arts community earned him the Springfield Regional Arts Council's "Ozzie Award" in 2006.

Ways to Connect

(Photo courtesy Missouri State University)

Since we've been talking this week about the issue of civility and civil discourse in Springfield, there's a program here at Missouri State University that deals every day with those very issues: the Center for Dispute Resolution, a part of the MSU Department of Communication. The Center provides numerous services and support programs to help individuals, organizations and communities deal with conflict in positive and productive ways.  And they can boast an impressive record of success in this area. So we thought the Center's Director and Associate Director, Dr. Charlene Berquist and Heather Blades, would have some valuable insight into the problem and creating, and maintaining, civil discourse in a society that seems to be geared toward everything but civility. 

(Photo courtesy Springfield Regional Arts Council)

Every summer the Springfield Regional Arts Council cooperates with the Springfield Community Center to present a six-week program for kids in Zones 1 and 2 who are served by the Community Center.  It's called "Arts in the Park"--Jordan Valley Park, to be exact, where the Arts Council's Creamery Arts Center offices are located. Each week during the six-week program, representatives  from Springfield's major visual and performing arts groups conduct week-long workshops with the kids based on each organization's specialty: the Symphony, Little Theatre, the Opera, the Art Museum, and so on.

(Photo: Randy Stewart)

The oud (pronounced "ood") is one of the more ancient musical instruments still actively utilized around the world.  You'll have a rare local opportunity to hear the oud played by a virtuoso on the instrument today (Friday Sept.22) at 5:00pm in Missouri State University's Craig Hall Coger Theater.

(Poster design courtesy Missouri State University Theatre and Dance)

The Diary of Anne Frank, first published in its original Dutch edition in 1947—70 years ago-- documents the lives of two Jewish families living hidden in a secret attic in Amsterdam, Holland between 1942 and 1944, as described through the words of a 13- to 15-year-old girl.  She wrote about the group’s day-to-day survival under constant threat of capture—and worse.  Her writings, intelligent, witty and candid, deal with her relationships with her fellow fugitives; her first love; her ideals and aspirations; her reflections on good and evil; and her hopes for a future that never came.

(Poster design courtesy Springfield Little Theatre)

Springfield Little Theatre opens its 83rd season with the musical "Mamma Mia!" at the Landers Theatre, 311 E. Walnut, Friday, September 15 through Sunday, October 8. Broadway star and Springfield native Kim Crosby stars as the mother, Donna. Performances start at 7:30pm on Thursdays-Saturdays and at 2pm on Sundays. Based on the hit songs by ABBA and the story by Catherine Johnson, "Mamma Mia!" tells the hilarious tale of 20-year-old Sophie, played by Sisilia Shaffer, living with her mother Donna on a sunny Greek island where Donna runs a small hotel. 

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