Here and Now

Monday-Thursday, 1-3 p.m.
  • Hosted by Robin Young, Jeremy Hobson

Stay up-to-date with the news between Morning Edition and All Things Considered.  Here & Now combines the best in news journalism with intelligent, broad-ranging conversation to form a fast-paced program that updates the news from the morning and adds important conversations on public policy and foreign affairs, science and technology, and the arts: film, theater, music, food, and more.

Led Zeppelin To Climb The Stairway To Court

Apr 22, 2016

Led Zeppelin band members Jimmy Page and Robert Plant are expected in court on May 10 for the beginning of a trial to determine whether their iconic song “Stairway to Heaven” was partially plagiarized from the song “Taurus” by a little-known 1960s band called Spirit.

Though Plant and Page say they don’t remember hearing the song or seeing Spirit perform, the plaintiffs argue that the lack of memory is due to drug and alcohol use by the band. Plant and Page are requesting that their past drug use not be admissible in the trial.

Uber reached a settlement in class-action lawsuits in California and Massachusetts, allowing the company to continue to classify workers as independent contractors rather than employees.

The settlement calls for Uber to pay as much as $100 million to about 385,000 drivers represented in the cases, but it allows the ride-hailing company to avoid having to pay minimum wage or contribute to workers’ Social Security.

Remembering The Life And Legacy Of Prince

Apr 21, 2016

Pop superstar Prince, widely acclaimed as one of the most inventive musicians of his era with hits including “Little Red Corvette,” “Let’s Go Crazy” and “When Doves Cry,” was found dead at his home on Thursday in suburban Minneapolis, according to his publicist.

His publicist, Yvette Noel-Schure, told The Associated Press that the music icon died at his home in Chanhassen. No details were immediately released.

Saudi Arabia warned last week that it would sell its investments in the U.S. if Congress passes a bill allowing victims of terror attacks like 9/11 to sue foreign governments. Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson talks with business journalist Ali Velshi about the impact if Saudi Arabia followed through on the threat.

The Treasury Department announced yesterday that Harriet Tubman will soon become the first African-American to be on the front of a currency bill, and the first woman on U.S. currency in a century.

Tubman, who’s best known for her work as an abolitionist, and a so-called conductor on the Underground Railroad, will replace President Andrew Jackson, a slave owner and anti-abolitionist, on the front of the $20.

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