Here and Now

Monday-Thursday, 1-3 p.m.
  • Hosted by Robin Young, Jeremy Hobson

Stay up-to-date with the news between Morning Edition and All Things Considered.  Here & Now combines the best in news journalism with intelligent, broad-ranging conversation to form a fast-paced program that updates the news from the morning and adds important conversations on public policy and foreign affairs, science and technology, and the arts: film, theater, music, food, and more.

The Washington Post reported Tuesday that Donald Trump spent more than $250,000 from his charitable foundation to settle lawsuits involving his businesses.

A sculpture with a secret message at CIA headquarters in Langley, Virginia, has stumped amateur code breakers for a quarter-century.

Elonka Dunin, a software developer from Nashville, Tennessee, has spent the better part of two decades trying to unravel the mystery of Kryptos.

Tony Youngblood from Here & Now contributor Nashville Public Radio has her story.

When the new National Museum of African American History and Culture opens this weekend in Washington, D.C., one of the exhibits will be a collection of photographs from the late 1930s to the 1940s, taken by a young African-American woman named Laura Fitzpatrick.

As NPR’s Elizabeth Blair reports, Fitzpatrick chose to capture images of life at its best.

A law enforcement official says the Afghan immigrant wanted in connection with explosions in New York City and New Jersey has been taken into custody following a shootout with police officers.

The official says two officers were shot in the encounter in Linden, New Jersey.

Authorities were looking for Ahmad Khan Rahami, a naturalized U.S. citizen from Afghanistan with an address in Elizabeth, New Jersey.

Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti gets the latest from NPR’s Hansi Lo Wang.

Guest

Historically, the working poor in America had very little leisure time while the upper class had plenty. Now, the opposite is true, at least for working class men.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson talks with Derek Thompson of The Atlantic about the surprising statistics, what working class men do with their leisure time and what might be the reasons behind their behavior.

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