Here and Now

Monday-Thursday, 1-3 p.m.
  • Hosted by Robin Young, Jeremy Hobson

Stay up-to-date with the news between Morning Edition and All Things Considered.  Here & Now combines the best in news journalism with intelligent, broad-ranging conversation to form a fast-paced program that updates the news from the morning and adds important conversations on public policy and foreign affairs, science and technology, and the arts: film, theater, music, food, and more.

Many analysts have compared Donald Trump’s campaign with that of Barry Goldwater, the outspoken conservative Arizona senator who lost in a 1964 landslide to Lyndon Johnson.

On Saturday Trump invited the comparison, hosting a fundraiser in the late Arizona senator’s former home. The Goldwater family no longer owns that property in Paradise Valley, Arizona, but the event has nonetheless fueled comparisons to the conservative icon.

California’s prolonged drought has led to millions of dead trees that could make tinder boxes of huge swaths of the state as it heads into fire season. But the American West isn’t the only place coming to grips with chronic drought.

The World Resources Institute mapped water stress around the world and found major regions of every inhabited continent have serious issues with water. Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd gets an overview of drought crises around the world from Betsy Otto, director of the World Resources Institute’s Global Water Program.

The United Kingdom votes Thursday on a proposal to leave the European Union. Last week, voters appeared to favor a Brexit for the first time since polling began on the referendum, but after the murder of MP Jo Cox, “Remain” is on top once again.

Nonetheless, economists are nervous that the move could have ripple effects for economic growth, trade and finance across Europe.

Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd discusses the economic implications of Brexit with Marcel Fratzscher, president of The German Institute for Economic Research.

This week, presumed Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump once again called for a temporary ban on Muslims and suggested President Obama was sympathetic to terrorists. Presumed Democratic Party nominee Hillary Clinton called Trump’s ideas nonsense, and called for a national assault weapons ban. Her rival Bernie Sanders, in a video message to supporters last night, didn’t concede the race and didn’t endorse Clinton.

Former Green Party candidate and consumer advocate Ralph Nader says the two-party American political system creates “second class citizens” out of third-party candidates.

He speaks with Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson about the flaws he saw in the Democratic primary, and says those who still blame him for Al Gore’s presidential loss in 2000 are “fact deprived.”

Interview Highlights: Ralph Nader

On which candidate he’s supporting

Pages