Here and Now

Monday-Thursday, 1-3 p.m.
  • Hosted by Robin Young, Jeremy Hobson

Stay up-to-date with the news between Morning Edition and All Things Considered.  Here & Now combines the best in news journalism with intelligent, broad-ranging conversation to form a fast-paced program that updates the news from the morning and adds important conversations on public policy and foreign affairs, science and technology, and the arts: film, theater, music, food, and more.

Long-term care facilities across Florida are being evaluated as police investigate the deaths of eight elderly people who died in a nursing home after Hurricane Irma. The storm has knocked out power at a time of sweltering heat.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with Associated Press reporter Terry Spencer (@terryspen) for the latest.

Bitcoin's Uncertain Future

Sep 13, 2017

JP Morgan CEO Jamie Dimon took another shot at Bitcoin this week, calling it a fraud and saying the market will eventually blow up. And late last week, state-owned media in China reported that Beijing plans to ban all cryptocurrency exchanges.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson talks about Bitcoin’s future with Jason Bellini (@jasonbellini) of The Wall Street Journal.

Two recent studies have found strong evidence that intestinal bacteria play a role in multiple sclerosis, an incurable autoimmune disease. The studies advance our understanding of how the microbiome is linked to multiple sclerosis and what potential treatments or prevention methods might be developed for the disease.

Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti talks with Sharon Begley (@sxbegle) of our partners at STAT about what the findings mean.

One of the coastal cities in Florida inundated with historic flooding after Irma was Jacksonville. The flooding was so severe in some places on Monday that the sheriff’s department said it had to rescue more than 350 people.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young talks to WJCT reporter Ryan Benk (@RyanMichaelBenk), who’s on the scene.

Airports across Florida are reopening Tuesday following closures due to Hurricane Irma. In order to get up and running again, airlines face many logistical hurdles in terms of getting equipment and workers where they need to be.

Plus, airlines have to look at the long-term losses that might come from hurricane damage. Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson talks with Seth Kaplan of Airline Weekly.

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