Missouri State Journal

Tuesday, 9:30 a.m.

The Missouri State Journal is a weekly program keeping you in touch with Missouri State University.

Collaboration – this coming together of two individuals or multiple entities to create something greater – is all around us. At times we love it and other times we hate it – usually because it challenges us.

Dr. Carrisa Hoelscher, assistant professor of communication at Missouri State University, explains her primary focus of research: Collaboration and the tensions that come along with it.

There is a major misunderstanding of the concept of tension. More than that, she is surprised by the lack of self-awareness she has seen when studying this tension. She elaborates.

Are you sitting down? The Calorie Control Council has estimated that Americans consume nearly 4,500 calories on Thanksgiving Day each year. Approximately 3,000 will be on your dinner plate, while drinks, snacks and desserts will stuff you with the remaining 1,500.

Natalie Allen, clinical instructor of dietetics in the biomedical sciences department at Missouri State University, gives us a few tips for identifying hidden high calorie items.

November is American Diabetes Month. This disease affects more than 30 million Americans.

Natalie Allen, clinical instructor of dietetics in the biomedical sciences department at Missouri State University, helps to raise  awareness of the benefits of proper nutrition.

But first she explains some of the foods that are typically high in glucose. Although most vegetables don’t metabolize into glucose, she reminds us to beware of these starchy veggies.

This past summer, Missouri State University student Madeline Hayes embarked on a journey she would never forget.

She left the comforts of home to help those who are suffering in one of the world’s most dangerous cities – Mosul, Iraq.

A senior nursing major, Hayes spent a month in Mosul with Free Burma Rangers (FBR), a humanitarian service movement founded by David Eubank, a former U.S. Special Forces operative. FBR provides aid in the conflict areas of Burma, Iraq and Sudan.

What would you do if you had the chance to save someone’s life?

That was a decision A’dja Jones from Missouri State University had to make. In 2014, she registered as a bone marrow donor at a drive on campus. The drive was in aid of MSU softball player Allie Alvstad, who had leukemia.

In 2015, Jones got a message that would change her life forever. She was a match for a young child and chose to give him her marrow. 

Pages