Sense of Community

March, June, September, December

From poverty concerns to major policy decisions, this series dives beyond the headlines to provide in-depth coverage of issues facing people and organizations in the Ozarks. KSMU's team of reporters combine for 10 stories each quarter, to air the final weeks of March, June, September and December.

Michele Skalicky

Mark Heady suffers from several health issues:  congestive heart failure, COPD and multiple sclerosis.  Because of those health concerns, he used to drop by his primary care physician’s office in Springfield without an appointment.

That, and the fact the he lives in a rural area, made him an ideal candidate for Mercy Virtual, which started up last summer.

CoxHealth

 

Anyone who is a parent of a school age child has probably received a call from a school nurse telling them their child isn't feeling well and needs to be picked up.  That usually involves either leaving work or finding someone to pick the child up and take them to the doctor—when you can get them in.  Once the patient is on medication, it can be another day before they can return to school.

NASA

Missouri State University Astronomy professor Mike Reed, likens his and his students research into vibrations of stars, to listening to a full orchestra play one long note, and picking out the sounds of individual instruments. 

Jennifer Moore / KSMU

In this Sense of Community segment on Innovation in the Ozarks, we’re in a large greenhouse. It belongs to Craig Jennings in Davis Creek, in rural, south-central Missouri.

“Here we have over 120 channels at this end of the greenhouse. And we have enough for eighteen hundred head of lettuce, which we put on a six weeks rotation,” Jennings said.

(Photo: Missouri State University Art and Design)

We're focusing on the "innovation" this week, and as it happens June 2017 marks the tenth anniversary of the IDEA Commons in center-city Springfield. I-D-E-A stands for "Innovation," "Design," "Entrepreneurship," and "Arts." The 88-acre area was developed by Missouri State University with the support of the City of Springfield and the Springfield Building Development Corporation. It's a collaborative community effort to rejuvenate downtown and stimulate economic development by renovating existing buildings, creating new jobs and retaining local talent.

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