Eric Greitens

Gov. Eric Greitens is facing growing opposition from lawmakers for possibly ousting Margie Vandeven as Missouri’s education commissioner, who oversees K-12 schools across the state.

Greitens’ five appointees to the State Board of Education — Claudia Onate Greim, Doug Russell, Eddy Justice, John “Tim” Sumners, and Marvin “Sonny” Jungmeyer — could vote next week on whether to fire Vandeven.

Justin Smith
Sarah Teague / KSMU

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens’ “No MO Red Tape” project is six months ahead of schedule, said the Governor’s Deputy Counsel Justin Smith.

The project launched in January when Greitens signed Executive Order 17-03, ordering all governmental agencies to undergo a review of all proposed or passed regulations in the Code of State Regulations.

“We’ve received almost 6,000 comments from people writing in on ways we can clean up state regulations,” Smith said in Springfield Wednesday. “Our folks are working hard. They’re actually on pace to finish a lot earlier than scheduled.”

Twitter / Missouri Department of Public Safety

Missouri officials say many state emergency responders are providing assistance along the Gulf Coast following devastation by Tropical Storm Harvey.

It’s significantly increased in recent days, according to the Missouri Department of Public Safety. The agency says 56 Missourians representing 18 different fire and ambulance departments deployed to Texas Wednesday to assist with swift water rescue operations.

Eric Greitens
Charlotte Hatch / KSMU

Calling the opioid epidemic a “modern plague,” Governor Eric Greitens asked Missourians Thursday to join the fight against the issue. Thursday’s comments at an opioid summit in Springfield came just days after he signed an executive order establishing a prescription drug monitoring program.

Greitens, who lost a cousin last year to a heroin overdose, implored community members and advocacy organizations to step up their efforts.

Missouri’s statewide prescription drug monitoring database will come online next month. There’s a key difference between it and databases throughout the U.S. and even in St. Louis County, which actually covers nearly 60 percent of the state.

The program, created by Gov. Eric Greitens by an executive order, will collect who is writing opioid prescriptions and dispensing the drugs, but only the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services can access the data. In every other state, pharmacists and doctors can see that type of data — which is the most successful way to stem opioid abuse, according to Sherry Green of the National Alliance for Model State Drug Laws.

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