PDMP

PDMP
St. Louis County PDMP

Stone County is the latest government entity to join St. Louis County’s prescription drug monitoring program.

Officials made the decision on Oct. 17. It allows doctors and pharmacists access to the database to crack down on prescription drug shoppers.

For five years now, the Missouri legislature has considered legislation to create a prescription drug monitoring database that would allow pharmacists and physicians to look at their patient's prescription history for signs of misuse of narcotics. And for five years, Missouri pharmacists like Erica Hopkins have watched those efforts fail with disappointment.


Eric Norris / Flickr

Springfield doctors and pharmacists will have a new tool to use when prescribing and handing out opiates and opioids.  Springfield City Council approved the implementation of a prescription drug monitoring program for the city Monday night. Hours later, Greene County commissioners approved a database county-wide.

The PDMP will be part of the St. Louis Consortium and will be voluntary for physicians to use and mandatory for pharmacists, according to City Councilman Dr. Tom Prater, who said it will be important in being able to evaluate a patient's needs.

Eric Greitens
Charlotte Hatch / KSMU

Calling the opioid epidemic a “modern plague,” Governor Eric Greitens asked Missourians Thursday to join the fight against the issue. Thursday’s comments at an opioid summit in Springfield came just days after he signed an executive order establishing a prescription drug monitoring program.

Greitens, who lost a cousin last year to a heroin overdose, implored community members and advocacy organizations to step up their efforts.

Missouri’s statewide prescription drug monitoring database will come online next month. There’s a key difference between it and databases throughout the U.S. and even in St. Louis County, which actually covers nearly 60 percent of the state.

The program, created by Gov. Eric Greitens by an executive order, will collect who is writing opioid prescriptions and dispensing the drugs, but only the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services can access the data. In every other state, pharmacists and doctors can see that type of data — which is the most successful way to stem opioid abuse, according to Sherry Green of the National Alliance for Model State Drug Laws.

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