Sense of Community

Christ Episcopal Church

On the corner of Kimbrough and Walnut in downtown Springfield sits one of the city’s oldest churches:  Christ Episcopal Church.  Inside, the Reverend Kenneth L. Chumbley, or “Father Ken” as he’s known, is delivering a sermon to his flock.

Father Ken has been here for nearly 22 years, and he says he’d rate the state of civility among Christian groups here in Springfield as “good.”

“It’s healthy. In my experience here, I can think of no occasion when Christians have been uncivil to one another. I think generally, we treat one another very respectfully. I think we generally treat one another as children of God,” Chumbley said.

(Photo courtesy Springfield Regional Arts Council)

Every summer the Springfield Regional Arts Council cooperates with the Springfield Community Center to present a six-week program for kids in Zones 1 and 2 who are served by the Community Center.  It's called "Arts in the Park"--Jordan Valley Park, to be exact, where the Arts Council's Creamery Arts Center offices are located. Each week during the six-week program, representatives  from Springfield's major visual and performing arts groups conduct week-long workshops with the kids based on each organization's specialty: the Symphony, Little Theatre, the Opera, the Art Museum, and so on.

Michele Skalicky

Social media has become a platform for people to share ideas and learn more about one another.  But it’s also become a battleground, of sorts—a place where people can hide behind words and say things they wouldn’t dare say to someone’s face.  A recent study done by Wired Magazine and Disqus looked at the number of toxic posts in each state.  In Missouri, the study found that 7.3 percent of posts over a 16-month period, included hostile content.

When President Donald Trump came to town, hateful comments between those who support Trump and those who don’t were flying. 

But there were people whose comments sought to calm the situation. 

Jennifer Moore / KSMU

In this Sense of Community segment on Innovation in the Ozarks, we’re in a large greenhouse. It belongs to Craig Jennings in Davis Creek, in rural, south-central Missouri.

“Here we have over 120 channels at this end of the greenhouse. And we have enough for eighteen hundred head of lettuce, which we put on a six weeks rotation,” Jennings said.

(Photo: Missouri State University Art and Design)

We're focusing on the "innovation" this week, and as it happens June 2017 marks the tenth anniversary of the IDEA Commons in center-city Springfield. I-D-E-A stands for "Innovation," "Design," "Entrepreneurship," and "Arts." The 88-acre area was developed by Missouri State University with the support of the City of Springfield and the Springfield Building Development Corporation. It's a collaborative community effort to rejuvenate downtown and stimulate economic development by renovating existing buildings, creating new jobs and retaining local talent.

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